Academic Work

Talking to the Dead – the Voice of the Victim in Crime Fiction

This is a paper that considers Margaret Atwood’s proposition that ‘Perhaps all writing is motivated, deep down, by a desire to make the risky trip to the Underworld, and to bring something or someone back from the dead’. In particular, it considers this proposition for the writer of crime fiction and explores how powerful specific aspects of the narrative voice can be for writers in this genre. Drawing on my own experience of writing crime fiction, as well as that of other practitioners, it discusses how insistent the voices of the dead can be in the solving of a fictional crime.

Available at Taylor & Francis

‘How the listener was lured in’

(2009) in The Short Story (ed. Cox, Ailsa)  Cambridge: Cambridge Scholars Publishing

Recent conference Papers

  • ‘Talk to me of love’ (November 2017) National Association of Writers in Education, York
  • ‘Designing an online MA’ (November 2017), panel discussion to National Association of Writers in Education, York
  • ‘Sun, sea and fairgrounds: the landscapes of crime fiction’ (July 2017), English Shared Futures Conference, Newcastle-upon-Tyne
  • ‘The insistent voices of the dead’ (March 2017) Contemporary Cultures of Writing Spring Seminars series, Institute of English Studies, University of London
  • ‘Still Life with Blackbirds – a collaboration between art and fiction’ (November 2016) with Richard Kenton Webb, National Association of Writers in Education, Stratford-upon-Avon
  • ‘Nailing the Thought Down’ (November 2015), Contemporary Cultures of Writing Autumn Seminar series, Institute of English Studies, University of London.
  • ‘Talking to the Dead‘, (July 2012) Great Writing Conference, London: Imperial College